Egr Ed Res (EER) Opportunities


This page lists descriptions of RFPs for STEM research that may be of interest in engineering, primarily NSF RFPs. Also listed are the due dates and the URL to the agency listing. 




Robert Noyce Teacher Scholarship Program (NSF 14-508) (Due Mar 5)

posted Jan 17, 2014, 7:03 AM by Jon Sticklen

http://www.nsf.gov/pubs/2014/nsf14508/nsf14508.pdf


The Robert Noyce Teacher Scholarship Program seeks to encourage talented science, technology, engineering, and mathematics majors and professionals to become K-12 mathematics and science teachers. The Noyce Scholarship Track provides funds to institutions of higher education to support scholarships, stipends, and academic programs for undergraduate STEM majors and post-baccalaureate students holding STEM degrees who earn a teaching credential and commit to teaching in high-need K-12 school districts.  The NSF Teaching Fellowship/Master Teaching Fellowship Track provides funding to support STEM professionals who enroll as NSF Teaching Fellows in master's degree programs leading to teacher certification by providing academic courses, professional development, and salary supplements while they are fulfilling a four-year teaching commitment in a high-need school district.  This track also supports the development of NSF Master Teaching Fellows by providing professional development and salary supplements for exemplary mathematics and science teachers to become Master Teachers while they fulfill a five-year teaching commitment in high-need school districts.  Capacity Building Projects support the development of new programs and activities to increase the capacity for institutions to provide innovative teacher preparation programs that enable increasing numbers of STEM majors and STEM professionals to become effective K-12 mathematics and science teachers and to develop the capacity to prepare Master science and mathematics teachers.


Letter of Intent Deadline Date: February 5, 2014


Full Proposal Deadline Date: March 5, 2014

STEM-C Partnerships: Computing Education for the 21st Century (STEM-CP: CE21) NSF 14-253 (Due Mar 18)

posted Jan 17, 2014, 7:02 AM by Jon Sticklen


 http://www.nsf.gov/pubs/2014/nsf14523/nsf14523.pdf


The STEM-C (Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics, including Computing) Partnerships program is a major research and development effort of two NSF Directorates, the Directorate for Education and Human Resources (EHR) and the Directorate for Computer and Information Science and Engineering (CISE), which supports innovative partnerships to improve teaching and learning in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) disciplines. STEM-C Partnerships combines and advances the efforts of both the former Math and Science Partnership (MSP) and the former Computing Education for the 21st Century (CE21) programs. It is critical that our nation maintain a competent, competitive and creative STEM workforce, including teachers. Therefore, NSF aims to inspire and motivate the next generation of that workforce, while ensuring that it has the skills, competencies, and preparation to be successful. As we transition to a global, knowledge-based economy that is often driven by information technology and innovation, it is increasingly important that STEM workforce preparation includes a strong foundation in computing. Thus, the STEM-C Partnerships program addresses both the need for advances in K-12 STEM education generally, as well as the need to elevate the inclusion of computer science education.


From MSP, STEM-C Partnerships embraces any of the STEM disciplines—within the natural sciences, mathematics, engineering, or computer science—and maintains its commitment to institutional partnerships and opportunities for funding of Targeted proposals in one of four focal areas: Community Enterprise for STEM Teaching and Learning, Current Issues Related to STEM Content, Identifying and Cultivating Exceptional Talent, and K-12 STEM Teacher Preparation. From CE21, STEM-C Partnerships adds a discipline-specific focal area on the teaching and learning of computing and computational thinking, a strong commitment to broadening participation in computing, an emphasis on in-service teacher professional development, and support for the implementation of computer science courses at the high school level. It is expected that the merging of the MSP and CE21 programs will strengthen both and serve as a model for future incorporation of discipline-specific concerns into programs focused more broadly on STEM.

 

The STEM-C Partnerships program supports Partnerships that promote effective K-12 STEM education, building knowledge of teaching and learning in ways that deepen understanding and stimulate further exploration of STEM education in both in- and out-of-school settings. The Partnerships’ cross-disciplinary teams call upon the expertise and research perspectives of learning scientists, including cognitive scientists, educational, developmental and social psychologists, social scientists and education researchers, as well as STEM, discipline-specific teachers, faculty, researchers, and scientists. The Partnerships provide the context and environment for the effective preparation, professional development, and ongoing support of K-12 teachers. Changes at the undergraduate level related to the preparation of K-12 STEM teachers are an implicit expectation of the work; in this way, the STEM-C Partnerships is a K-16 endeavor. Projects are encouraged to look at scalable models of effective learning and professional development mediated, perhaps, by evolving computational devices and advances in cyberinfrastructure, as well as ongoing developments in models, resources, tools, and their applications to learning, content, delivery, and pedagogy. The program supports transformative research and its use by varied research, development, and implementation communities. The needs of a particular Partnership related to advancing the teaching and learning of any of the STEM disciplines at the K-12 level should drive the focus of the Partnership’s work. The inclusion of computer science, computational thinking, computational science or computing in K-12 STEM instruction is welcome, but not required.

 

All STEM-C Partnerships projects serve as models that have a sufficiently strong evidence/research base to improve STEM education outcomes for all students. The STEM-C Partnerships program requires institutional commitment to evidence-based teaching and learning which improves the achievement of all students studying STEM, with particular attention to educational practices that are effective for groups underrepresented in STEM—women, minorities (African-Americans, Hispanics, Native Americans, Alaska Natives, Native Hawaiians and other Pacific Islander territories), and students with disabilities.


Due Date:  March 18, 2014

STEM-C Partnerships: MSP (STEM-CP:MSP) NSF 14-522 (Mar 18 deadline)

posted Jan 17, 2014, 7:00 AM by Jon Sticklen


http://www.nsf.gov/pubs/2014/nsf14522/nsf14522.pdf


The STEM-C (Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics, including Computing) Partnerships program is a major research and development effort of two NSF Directorates, the Directorate for Education and Human Resources and the Directorate for Computer and Information Science and Engineering, which supports innovative partnerships to improve teaching and learning in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) disciplines. STEM-C Partnerships combines and advances the efforts of both the former Math and Science Partnership (MSP) and the former Computing Education for the 21st Century (CE21) programs. It is critical that our nation maintain a competent, competitive and creative STEM workforce, including teachers. Therefore, NSF aims to inspire and motivate the next generation of that workforce, while ensuring that it has the skills, competencies, and preparation to be successful. As we transition to a global, knowledge-based economy that is often driven by information technology and innovation, it is increasingly important that STEM workforce preparation includes a strong foundation in computing. Thus, the STEM-C Partnerships program addresses both the need for advances in K-12 STEM education generally, as well as the need to elevate the inclusion of computer science education.

 

From MSP, STEM-C Partnerships embraces any of the STEM disciplines --within the natural science, mathematics, engineering, or computer science -- and maintains its commitment to institutional partnerships and opportunities for funding of Targeted proposals in one of four focal areas: Community Enterprise for STEM Teaching and Learning, Current Issues Related to STEM Content, Identifying and Cultivating Exceptional Talent, and K-12 STEM Teacher Preparation. From CE21, STEM-C Partnerships adds a discipline-specific focal area on the teaching and learning of computing and computational thinking, a strong commitment to broadening participation in computing, an emphasis on in-service teacher professional development, and support for the implementation of computer science courses at the high school level. It is expected that the merging of the MSP and CE21 programs will strengthen both and serve as a model for future incorporation of discipline-specific concerns into programs focused more broadly on STEM.

 

The STEM-C Partnerships program supports Partnerships that promote effective K-12 STEM education, building knowledge of teaching and learning in ways that deepen understanding and stimulate further exploration of STEM education in both in- and out-of-school settings. The Partnerships' cross-disciplinary teams call upon the expertise and research perspectives of learning scientists, including cognitive scientists, educational, developmental and social psychologists, social scientists and education researchers, as well as STEM, discipline-specific teachers, faculty, researchers, and scientists. The Partnerships provide the context and environment for the effective preparation, professional development, and ongoing support of K-12 teachers. Changes at the undergraduate level related to the preparation of K-12 STEM teachers are an implicit expectation of the work; in this way, the STEM-C Partnerships is a K-16 endeavor. Projects are encouraged to look at scalable models of effective learning and professional development mediated, perhaps, by evolving computational devices and advances in cyberinfrastructure, as well as ongoing developments in models, resources, tools, and their applications to learning, content, delivery, and pedagogy. The program supports transformative research and its use by varied research, development, and implementation communities. The needs of a particular Partnership related to advancing the teaching and learning of any of the STEM disciplines at the K-12 level should drive the focus of the Partnership's work. The inclusion of computer science, computational thinking, computational science or computing in K-12 STEM instruction is welcome, but not required.

 

All STEM-C Partnerships projects serve as models that have a sufficiently strong evidence/research base to improve STEM education outcomes for all students. The STEM-C Partnerships program requires institutional commitment to evidence-based teaching and learning which improves the achievement of all students studying STEM, with particular attention to educational practices that are effective for groups underrepresented in STEMwomen, minorities (African-Americans, Hispanics, Native Americans, Alaska Natives, Native Hawaiians and other Pacific Islander territories), and students with disabilities. Through this solicitation, NSF seeks to support both STEM-C Partnerships Targeted awards and STEM-C Partnerships Computer Science Education Expansion awards. The Targeted Partnerships are supported at two funding levels (Implementation and Prototype) and are open to innovative Partnerships composed minimally of at least two Core Partners, a K-12 School District and an institution that brings disciplinary expertise in the natural sciences, mathematics, engineering and/or computer science and is actively engaged in the production of STEM teachers. STEM-C Partnerships Targeted awards may focus on any field of mathematics, or the natural sciences, or engineering, or computer science at the K-12 level. Targeted Prototype awards explore potentially innovative approaches and strategies in education. Targeted Implementation awards are intended to develop and put into practice innovative approaches and strategies in education. Both types of Partnerships incorporate significant new innovations to STEM education, linked to a strong educational research agenda, in one of five focal areas described below.

 

The STEM-C Partnerships Computer Science Education Expansion awards are open only to NSF MSP Partnerships that have been previously funded to work at the high school level and who seek to expand their work to increase the number of qualified computer science teachers and the number of high schools with rigorous computer science courses incorporated into the academic program.


Due Date:  March 18, 2014

 

NSF Improving Undergraduate STEM Education Program Description and Webinars

posted Nov 22, 2013, 7:04 PM by Kathy Dehshiri   [ updated Jan 17, 2014, 6:54 AM by Jon Sticklen ]

NSF has released a new program description PD14-7513 titled Improving Undergraduate STEM Education
(IUSE) that provides a mechanism for submitting proposals for research-based
and research-generating approaches to: 
The IUSE webinars will be held from:

. 1:00-2:30pm (EST) on December 3, 4, and 5; and
. 3:00-4:30pm (EST) on December 10, 11, and 12.

To register for one of these webinars, please access the registration website.

REAL FY14 Solicitation Webinar Series (Nov. 25)

posted Nov 20, 2013, 7:52 AM by Kathy Dehshiri   [ updated Nov 20, 2013, 8:13 AM ]

You are subscribed to Events - All NSF Events for National Science Foundation Update. This information has recently been updated, and is now available.

 Nov 25 2013 2:00PM to

Nov 25 2013 3:00PM

Webinar

The purpose of these Webinars is to inform researchers about opportunities to submit proposals to the new Research on Education and Learning (REAL) solicitation ((NSF 13-604). REAL represents the substantive foci of three previous EHR programs:the Research and Evaluation on Education in Science and Engineering (REESE), Research in Disabilities Education (RDE), and Research on Gender ... 
More at http://www.nsf.gov/events/event_summ.jsp?cntn_id=129625&WT.mc_id=USNSF_13&WT.mc_ev=click



New Reporting Items for NSF-Funded Projects

posted Aug 24, 2011, 11:54 AM by Jon Sticklen

To comply with "America Competes" NSF has two reporting requirements. 

You have probably heard of the "mentoring plan" you must have if your project includes funding for post docs.But you may not have hear of the "Project Outcomes Report" that is required annually. Its a description of your work that is suitable for the general public. 

Read more here

NSF Cyberlearning. Deadline July 14.

posted Jun 14, 2011, 7:13 PM by Jon Sticklen

This NSF program is focused on leveraging technology with what we know about how people learn to make advances in how people learn. 

Full details on the NSF website here

Two KEY Submission Deadlines SOON... Mar 31 & May 26

posted Feb 14, 2011, 10:37 AM by Jon Sticklen   [ updated Feb 14, 2011, 10:45 AM ]

The new NSF RIGEE Program for initiating research in engineering education kicks off with a submission deadline on March 31. This program is aimed at building capability in engineering for combining classroom instruction with educational research.  If you are interested, please contact CEER for help. We can either pair a person in CEER directly with you, or work to get you paired with a person in education or cognitive science.

The NSF TUES (formally CCLI) program deadline is May 26. TUES is a general program supporting STEM educational research. 

New NSF EER Program - Research Initiation Grants

posted Nov 17, 2010, 5:23 AM by Jon Sticklen

NSF has announced a new program to support Engineering Education Research: Research Initiation Grants in Engineering Education. Deadline is on March 31, 2011, this coming year. The purpose of this program is to encourage engineering disciplinary faculty to initiate a collaboration with a colleague in learning and cognitive sciences. 

ASEE 2010 - Abstracts Open

posted Sep 3, 2010, 1:01 PM by Jon Sticklen   [ updated Sep 3, 2010, 1:04 PM ]

(forwarded from an email sent to ASEE members) 


New Website and Author's Kits 

 

September 3, 2010 

 

Dear ASEE Annual Conference Participants, 

 

We are pleased to announce that the new ASEE website is up and running.  This new website is also host to our new paper management system that we will be launching to accept abstracts for the 2011 Annual Conference on September 8, 2010.  The conference will be held on June 23-29, 2011 in Vancouver, BC, Canada.  For a conference overview, please visit http://www.asee.org/conferences-and-events/conferences/annual-conference/2011

 

To get started, please go to http://www.asee.org  and click the "log in" link in the upper right hand corner to log into the paper management system or to set up your account. 

 

If you are submitting an abstract to the annual conference, you will need to print a copy of the Author's Kit.  The Author's Kits is located at http://www.asee.org/conferences-and-events/conferences/annual-conference/2011/program-schedule/AuthorKit.pdf.  The Author's Kit has all of the information that you will need to guide you through the abstract submission process all the way to paper delivery.

 

If you have questions regarding to the paper management process, please first view the Author's Kit before contacting me (Wayne Davis, Program Manager) at (202)331-3530 or w.davis@asee.org for assistance. 

 

Thanks in advance for your patience and understanding as we strive to better ASEE products and services.

 

Regards,

 

Wayne Davis

Program Manager

American Society for Engineering Education

1818 N St., NW, Suite 600

Washington, DC 20036

p 202-331-3530

f 202-265-8504

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